In an earlier post I wrote about the importance of intentional role models. With some recent public scrutiny of certain politicians, it’s worth revisiting.

You really don’t have to look very far to validate the inescapability of the impact of Intentionomics® for yourself, and the impact of your intentions on living a happy, flourishing and prosperous life.

All you need do is to keep at the top of your mind the platform principle of Intentionomics® – People Get Your Truth … over time, your intentions, your actions and your results will either promote you or expose you.

Your intentions and character matter!

Currently, the Australian Labor Government is experiencing the impact of Intentionomics® with the fallout from the alleged goings-on of the Speaker of The Lower House, Peter Slipper and the currently sidelined MP, Craig Thomson.

As a nation, I’m convinced that most thinking Australians are watching this, shaking their heads in disbelief.

Shadow Treasurer Jo Hockey suggested in an interview, something like (and I’m paraphrasing here) being a politician and to serve your country is a noble profession.  I for one, wouldn’t argue against that.

However, in Politics, because of the very nature of being in the public eye, the platform principle of Intentionomics® – People Get Your Truth – is ringing loud.

Of course, Politicians are not alone here. Professional sportspeople, musicians, actors, and leaders of publicly listed companies just to name a few, are all under public scrutiny.

But surely this is no different for you or I? Apart from the fact they are under public scrutiny, the reality is we are all under the scrutiny of our own public and community – ourselves, our family, our close and extended relationships.

Light Of Day Test – For Ethical/Moral/Intentional Decision Making:

Perhaps a reminder of an ethical decision making process I learned about while completing my Masters Degree in Professional Ethics is timely (maybe a little late for the likes of Messrs Skinner and Thomson).  The light of day test is this: With any decision you’re about to make and any action you’re about to take, would you make that decision or take that action if it was held up in the light of day for all to see? In other words, if your decisions and actions were known by your family, your friends and the media to be splashed across the front page of a newspaper or on the evening news, would you still make the decision or take the action?

In my writing and at conference presentations I constantly refer to one of my favourite quotes from the author of the book The Truth About Trust, Vanessa Hall.  Vanessa says “Trust is fragile.” What a wonderful way to describe trust.  You don’t get trust, you earn it and this is fundamental to living a happy, flourishing and prosperous life.

It starts with self-trust

You can’t escape your own truth about you. Your personal truth about your character, your trust-worthiness will over time show through your actions.  Aristotle said “We are the sum of our actions” and that “our actions and behaviours are our morals shown in conduct.”

Here’s a simple yet powerful way to take stock of your truth about you (Inescapable Truth #2 of the Intentionomics® Blueprint of 9 Inescapable Truths for a Prosperous Life):

1. What are you currently doing (overtly or covertly) that if you were to stop doing it, would result in you being more proud of yourself, more trusting of yourself and therefore, more trust-worthy in your close and extended relationships?

2. What are you currently not doing that if you were to start doing it, would result in you being more proud of yourself, more trusting of yourself and therefore, more trust-worthy in your close and extended relationships?

3. What are you currently doing that if you were to continue doing it, would result in you being more proud of yourself, more trusting of yourself and therefore, more trust-worthy in your close and extended relationships?

Your truth about you exists in the questions you’re prepared to ask of yourself and in the reality of your intentions, your actions and your results.

The reality of being human is that we all get it wrong from time to time and can make mistakes we wish we never made. When we are clear on our intention and when that intention was not to make the mistake or to cause a negative outcome for ourselves or for others, trust, although fragile, can be mended. However, when the same or similar mistakes are repeated, intention is at question, trust moves from a stress fracture to being broken, and once broken, trust is very difficult (while not impossible) to mend.

Let me know what you think.