take stock of your truthAre you making intentional decisions and taking intentional actions that will help you to thrive in your business and flourish in your life?

Advice that Liz and I have always given to our sons as they leave our home is “Make good decisions!”

It’s become a bit of a mantra for our sons, and I’m proud to say they (mostly) do make good decisions.

Self-trust is so important.

Our future self needs to know that our current self is making good decisions and taking positive actions. This is where it’s important to have the courage to take stock of our truth about the way we are living our lives.

One easy way to take stock of your truth (one of the 9 inescapable truths for a prosperous life outlined in the Intentionomics Blueprint) is to use Professor Carol Ryff’s six elements of well-being as a guide to your overall sense of well-being.

Read the definitions for each of the six elements below and give yourself a rating between 1 being low and 10 being high.

Self-acceptance: To what extent do you possess a positive attitude toward yourself? To what extent do you acknowledge and accept that you have good and bad qualities? To what extent do you feel positive about the life you’ve led up to now?

Positive relations with others: To what extent do you have warm, satisfying, trusting relationships with others? To what extent are you concerned about the welfare of others? To what extent are you capable of strong empathy, affection, and intimacy? To what extent do you understand the need for give and take in your relationships?

Autonomy: To what extent are you self-determining and independent? To what extent are you able to resist social pressures to think and act in certain ways? To what extent do you regulate your behaviour from within? To what extent do you regularly evaluate yourself by personal standards?

Environmental mastery: To what extent do you have a sense of mastery and competence in managing the environment within which you work and live? To what extent do you control the complexities of often conflicting priorities in life? To what extent do you make effective use of life’s opportunities? To what extent are you able to choose or create situations that are aligned with your personal needs and values?

Purpose in life: To what extent do you have goals in life and a sense of directedness? To what extent do you feel you have meaning in your life? To what extent do you hold beliefs that give your life purpose? To what extent do you have aims and objectives for living?

Personal growth: To what extent do you invest your time and resources into continued personal and professional development? To what extent do you see yourself as growing in character? To what extent are you open to new experiences? To what extent do you have a sense of realizing your potential? To what extent do you see improvement in yourself, your character, your choices, decisions and actions? To what extent are you changing in ways that reflect more self-knowledge and effectiveness?

Ryff’s research shows that people who self-report higher levels within each of these six elements are more likely to have higher reported levels of wellbeing in their personal and professional lives.

While these six elements may not be the only things in life that matter, they’re a very good place to start to take stock of your truth and to set intentional choices and to take intentional actions to increase your capacity within each of these element.

Warm regards,
David
PS… don’t forget, I always welcome your feedback and if you’d like to have me present at your next conference on how to build more intentional trust relationships in leadership, sales, or customer service, or would like to explore how we can work together to boost your team’s success, call me at my Sydney office on 02 9546 2492.